Bruce L. Miller, MD, Chief Medical Officer of The John Douglas French Alzheimer's Foundation, has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine.

Bruce L. Miller, MD, Chief Medical Officer of The John Douglas French Alzheimer's Foundation, has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine.  

Election to the National Academy of Medicine is one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine, recognizing individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievements and commitment to service in the medical sciences, health care and public health — in Dr. Miller’s case, as a contrarian who believed the type of disease causing dementia symptoms in a patient could be determined while the patient was still alive. 

Dr. Miller, who is the A. W. and Mary Margaret Clausen Distinguished Professor in Neurology and Director of the UCSF Memory and Aging Center, is principal investigator of the NIH-sponsored Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, co-director of the Global Brain Health Institute, and leader of two philanthropy-funded research consortia, the Tau Consortium and the Consortium for Frontotemporal Research. 

He has received numerous awards including the Potamkin Award from the American Academy of Neurology, the Raymond Adams Award from the American Neurological Association and the Wallace Wilson Distinguished Alumni Award from the University of British Columbia. 

We are proud to note that Dr. Miller has served as the Chief Medical Officer of The John Douglas French Alzheimer's Foundation since it was founded in 1983.  In that time, Dr. Miller has overseen several hundred research projects funded by the Foundation.  We congratulate Dr. Miller on this recognition of his enormous talent, deep dedication, and true compassion.

First Alzheimer's Drug Shown in Early Stage Clinical Trial to Remove Beta Amyloid Plaque and Slow Cognitive Decline.

As of the end of last year (2014), more than two-hundred forty-four Alzheimer's drug compounds have been tested, with failure rate that exceeds 99 percent.  

But a new treatment is showing real promise in early stage clinical trials.

The results of a new early-stage trial, reported at the AD/PD 2015: International Conference on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases, and a further analysis of subgroup treatment response presented at the recent American Academy of Neurology (AAN) 67th Annual Meeting, showed that a monoclonal antibody, aducanumab (formerly known as BIIB037), developed by Biogen Inc., significantly reduced amyloid plaque in the brain over the 1 year study period and slowed cognitive decline.

"Treatment with aducanumab results in a dose-dependent and time-dependent effect that is consistent across APOE ε4 carriers and noncarriers, and among subjects with both mild and prodromal disease," lead author Jeffrey Sevigny, MD, Biogen Inc, stated.  

This is significant as more than 50 percent of people with AD are APOE ε4 carriers.

Scientists are cautiously optimistic, in light of a history of other drugs which have shown promis in early stages, only to fail in later, larger scale trials.

Based on these early-stage results, Aducanumab will now move directly to phase III trials.

Learn more about aducanumab here, here, and here